University of Minnesota
Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science
mcps@umn.edu
612-625-6635
myU OneStop


Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science home page.

Historical & Philosophical Perspectives of Science

Volume 5: Minnesota Studies in Philosophy of Science

Table of Contents

Forward…v
Peter Caws, Hunter College of the City University of New York

Preface…ix
Roger H. Stuewer, University of Minnesota

Synopsis…xi

Beyond Peaceful Coexistence…3
Herbert Feigl, University of Minnesota

The History and Philosophy of Science: A Taxonomy …12
Ernan McMullin, University of Notre Dame

  1. Two Senses of 'Science '…15
  2. History of Science…16
  3. Two Approaches to the History of Science…21
  4. Three Approaches to Philosophy of Science…23
  5. HS and Some Philosophers…29
  6. Philosophy of Science: Three Areas of Inquiry…43
  7. Philosophy and Psychology…49
  8. Logic and History…55
  9. Can One Do History and Philosophy of Science Together?…59
  10. History as the Clue to Ontology…63

Bayes's Theorem and the History of Science …68
Wesley C. Salmon, Indiana University

  1. Introduction…68
  2. The Distinction between Discovery and Justification…71
  3. Bayes's Theorem and the Context of Justification…74
  4. The Status of Prior Probabilities…81

Inference to Scientific Laws…87
Peter Achinstein, Johns Hopkins University

  1. Comment by Arnold Koslow, City University of New York…104
  2. Comment by Peter A. Bowman, Grinnell College…107
  3. Reply by Peter Achinstein…109

Science: Has its Present Past a Future?…112
Arnold Thackray/em>, University of Pennsylvania

  1. Comment by Laurens Laudan, University of Pittsburgh…127
  2. Reply by Arnold Thackray…132

Hermeticism and Historiography: An Apology for the Internal History of Science …134
Mary Hesse, University Of Cambridge

  1. Comment by Arnold Thackray…160

Was Copernicus a Hermetist? …163
Edward Rosen, City University of New York

  1. Internal-External History of Science…163
  2. The Case of Archimedes…163
  3. Copernicus and Hermetism…164
  4. Bruno and Copernicus…169
  5. Modern Science and Hermetism…171

Philosophy of Science: A Subject with a Great Past …172
Paul K. Feyerabend, University of California, Yale University, and University of London

Mach's Philosophical Use of the History of Science …184
Erwin N. Hiebert, University of Wisconsin

  1. Mach: Physicist…184
  2. Mach: Historian of Science…187
  3. Mach: Philosopher of Science…193
  4. Mach: Historian-Philosopher…197

History of Science and Criteria of Choice …204
Gerd Buchdahl, University of Cambridge

  1. Comment by Laurens Laudan…230
  2. Comment by Henry Small, American Institute of Physics…238
  3. Reply by Gerd Buchdahl…239

Non-Einsteinian Interpretations of the Photoelectric Effect…246
Roger H. Stuewer, University of Minnesota

On the Notion of Field in Newton, Maxwell, and Beyond …264
Howard Stein, Case Western Reserve University

  1. Comment by Gerd Buchdahl…287
  2. Comment by Mary Hesse…298
  3. Reply by Howard Stein…299

Outlines of a Logic of Comparative Theory Evaluation with Special Attention to Pre- and
Post-Relativistic Electrodynamics
…311
Kenneth F. Schaffner, University of Chicago

  1. Introduction…311
  2. An Analysis of Scientific Theory and Experiment…314
    1. Antecedent Theoretical Meaning…314
    2. Correspondence Rules and Theory Interdependence…315
    3. Theory and Experiment…317
  3. Hertz on the Foundations of Mechanics and the Logic of Comparative Theory Evaluation…318
  4. A Generalization of Hertz's Categories of Comparative Theory Evaluation…320
    1. Theoretical Context Sufficiency…320
    2. Experimental Adequacy…321
    3. Simplicity…326
  5. The Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies in the Early Twentieth Century…330
  6. The Lorentz "Absolute" Theory…332
    1. The Foundations of the Electron Theory…332
    2. Lorentz's Electron Theory Applied to Moving Bodies…334
  7. Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity…337
  8. A Comparison of Lorentz's and Einstein's Theories from the Point of View of the Logic of Comparative Theory Evaluation…339
    1. Theoretical Context Sufficiency…339
    2. Simplicity…342
    3. Experimental Adequacy…345
  9. Implications of the Above Tricategorical Analysis for the Relation of the History and Philosophy of Science…349
  10. Comment by Howard Stein…354
  11. Comment by Arnold Koslow…356
  12. Comment by Peter A. Bowman…364
  13. Reply by Kenneth F. Schaffner…365

Name Index…431

Subject Index…437

find us on Facebook